I am done with Ford ranger

Jacob

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How's the 6G Ranger motor going to be affected by the new PHEV system. If you have a commute within its range the motor will be used even less.
Well I would say take back roads and lengthen your commute 🤷🏼‍♂️
I didn’t buy my ranger thinking about commutes. I bought it because I wanted a truck I liked and wasn’t over the top. If that’s your circumstances and you are that worried about it, I don’t know what to tell you, that’s on you. Some people are bothered when I tell them I have a truck less than 2 years old (she’ll be 2 in a week 🥲) with over 50k and think it’s the worse thing ever. If you enjoy a vehicle, you’ll put up with the little quirks it has or try to fix them yourself. Shoot my gas gauge works only 50% of the time. Am I going to take it to ford to have them completely tear apart the gas system, Hell no! I’ve Got a perfectly good odometer that tells me when I hit 350 miles and should fill up. The gas in the oil, the short commutes, not warming your truck up, it’s all little things that really have been answered probably by 10+ threads each since the ‘19 came out.
Don’t even get me started on the octane debate again. Everyone knows the damper is what doubles the horsepower after all.
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OCL

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OCL. Interesting. The Ranger does not seem like a city vehicle from your opinion. Wow 15 to 20 miles to warm up. 100 miles every weekend.
I live in a city myself AND work from home so my truck is like yours: it sits in garage all week unless I'm running an errand. On weekends, lots of stop and go driving for me as well, so I turn off the Start-Stop until I know the engine has warmed up fully. But I always make it a point to take the truck outside of the city limits and drive it....I do have access to nearby mountains and deserts. So 20 minutes away are nice mountain roads with little traffic early in the morning. A handful of off road trails too. That's when I can let the 2.3 breathe hard a little. So much fun. I feed mine 91 octane and it noticeably runs much better compared to when I was breaking it in with 87 octane. More acceleration for sure. More midrange power too. And it feels a bit....smoother/more responsive...but this could be a Placebo effect. I definitely can attest to the more power part. So I know this engine WANTS 91 octane.

Next year I will add the Ford Performance tune. 45 more hp baby! Try that on a GM/Toyota/Nissan V6! Haha. Already the fastest midsize truck in the market stock. It only gets better. And while all those NA V6's are weezing at high elevation, my Ranger is still putting out Sea Level power. This is why I wanted a Turbocharged engine.
 

OCL

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Probably depends on where he lives. I live in the foothills of Cali and it takes my truck all but 5 minutes to warm up in winter. Any longer and I’m just wasting gas
Exactly. I'm 20 minutes away from a local mountain range. And only an 1.5 hours away from the open desert. Out there it's a huge 4x4 playground of all sorts of vehicles. I swear it's Jeep Wrangler/Subaru Crosstrek/Trophy Toy Truck city out there.
 

Floyd

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OCL. Interesting. The Ranger does not seem like a city vehicle from your opinion. Wow 15 to 20 miles to warm up. 100 miles every weekend.
Actually small aluminum engines tend to warm up quicker than large cast iron engines.
The also cool down a lot quicker as well.
A fully warmed up engine brings all components to the most efficient tolerances and evaporates any fuel in the crankcase which got through on a cold rich running engine. (This takes a few minutes)
Large cast engines stay warm for a lot longer after shut down as well.

The 15 to 20 minutes does not imply that the coolant takes that long to warm the cab, it refers to the time for the engine components to heat soak.
You might be surprised to know that the rest of the truck has to warm up to be most efficient as well...
Tires come up to pressure, wheel bearings warm up, transmissions and differentials do as well.
Some years ago, manual transmissions and differentials used single viscosity (commonly 90W) gear lube. On a cold morning you were lucky if you could force the shifter into gear with both hands, They even used to make a pan designed to put hot coals under the crank case just to get the engine to crank over. Even the engine oil flows better at operating temperature.

None of this is unique to the Ranger. Fact is that the majority of wear on just about any engine is during the first few seconds after a cold start, then during warm up until the temps start to rise.

The point is that cold engines, running rich, will wear more and contaminate more than a warm engine with good fuel management
 
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jblc

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I say drive it 100 miles every weekend and enjoy that class leading power.
Forgive me for using your quote just as a motivator for the thoughts below...it's just a helpful catalyst for what's on my mind related to this :)

I agree that this is useful overall for an engine, but a person has to be in a privileged position, to even contemplate pampering a vehicle in this way -- when a properly designed vehicle should not need pampering.

Many people don't have this luxury, and are buying a vehicle with the expectation that it will "just work".

Driving around on a long trip each weekend needs these things:
1) enough spare money to just (literally) burn gas.
2) being okay with more emissions to the environment for driving without real purpose, for an engine that should instead just work under *all* operating conditions (and not needing long trips to fix)
3) Few enough responsibilities / financial class to have time each weekend to just drive.


I'm only using your quote as an example to mention the above :), because I've heard this on this forum elsewhere many times, and from Ford dealers as well: paraphrased, "the Ranger is meant to be driven on regular long trips, so essentially just go drive it around aimlessly to fix our design problem". (If indeed there is a design issue)

No other vehicle that I know of, including other Ford turbocharged engines, need to be driven in a special way to keep from damaging itself. City start-stop is fine. That will reduce the engine life for any vehicle, but would not cause fuel in oil issues.

If it's true that the Ranger needs regular long drives to avoid damage, it's poor engine design; and Ford should own up to that, and not misplace the responsibility to the consumer to "fix" their design errors through driving actions that require a person that is highly privileged.

We didn't buy an engine that can self-destruct unless pampered -- that unacceptable.
 
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Dgc333

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I have been driving 4 cyl turbo vehicles continuously for the past 36 years during that time I have accumulated approximately 750,000 miles on them, that's an average of a little over 20k miles per year. I have never had an internal engine or turbo failure and several of these cars had over 200,000 miles on them and most well over 100k miles before moving on.

None of these vehicles got any special treatment that you wouldn't do to any vehicle. Don't go WOT until the water temp is in the normal range. Change oil on the prescribed intervals (7500 miles when using synthetic) and give the engine a minute or so of normal driving after romping on it before shutting it off to cool down the turbo housing.
 

OCL

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Forgive me for using your quote just as a motivator for the thoughts below...it's just a helpful catalyst for what's on my mind related to this :)

I agree that this is useful overall for an engine, but a person has to be in a privileged position, to even contemplate pampering a vehicle in this way -- when a properly designed vehicle should not need pampering.

Many people don't have this luxury, and are buying a vehicle with the expectation that it will "just work".

Driving around on a long trip each weekend needs these things:
1) enough spare money to just (literally) burn gas.
2) being okay with more emissions to the environment for driving without real purpose, for an engine that should instead just work under *all* operating conditions (and not needing long trips to fix)
3) Few enough responsibilities / financial class to have time each weekend to just drive.

...If it's true that the Ranger needs regular long drives to avoid damage, it's poor engine design; and Ford should own up to that, and not misplace the responsibility to the consumer to "fix" their design errors through driving actions that require a person that is highly privileged.
This is a very interesting point of view. And there is a lot of truth to it. People who are economically challenged won't just drive to drive.

I don't really think about that inequality thing. Because quite frankly, the world is not fair. Some people will be disadvantaged and others will not, and I am not responsible for that. Fate is. I work hard to get where I want to be, so did my parents and it is not up to me to make things equal. That's the government's job, which is to give everyone the same opportunity to succeed. I figured anyone who can afford a '19-21 Ranger is going to have Financial resources to go out and have fun. Because I'm speaking from that perspective. I do like to drive and ride (motorcycles). That is what I do for fun. It's my hobby. Being outdoors, hitting the trails, hiking, riding my bicycle, enjoying what mother nature has gifted to us. That's why I bought a Tremor. Otherwise I would have just kept my FWD car that I had years ago.

I will have to partially disagree with you on not needing to take your vehicle on long trips. It is most definitely beneficial to drive your vehicle for longer periods, no matter what it is. It is not good for any vehicle to just be driven short distances with a lot of stopping and going, start-stop, etc. That falls under "severe duty" cycle. And all the manufacturers will require more frequent oil changes for good reason. Will it die if you don't? Of course not. Do you need to drive it hard? Not at all. I love to buy used trucks from people that pampered them! :LOL:

FYI: When you're breaking in a new engine, you're supposed to let it rev out to mate the pistons to cylinder bore. Then let the engine cool down. Not pamper it. Not abuse it. Don't lug it or stress it or tow with it. Let it fully warm up before driving it hard. That's the proper break in on any engine. After that, do what you want with it.
 
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Josebd

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Thank you everybody,I feel better knowing that if I just romp on it every now and then it should be ok,besides it in warranty,so I’ll drive it like I live
 

Dr. Zaius

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I stopped by yesterday at the dealership and see what's up with my truck. Been there 1 week. Its sitting outside. They put a call into Ford's hotline and have not heard back from them yet. They say they don't know how to fix something when they don't know what is causing the issue. Apparently what they did on the one and only other Ranger leaking fuel into the oil did not resolve the problem and resulted in them buying the truck back. I told him (the svc mgr), if you have a conversation with them about it you can tell them I'd just assume they buy it back or trade me for an F150 Lariat or above or an Explorer ST.
When you win a lemon law in Florida you have your choice of them buying it back or exchanging it for another vehicle of equal value. I know neither one of those vehicles I want are of equal value but who knows, Ford might just pull one out of their hat and do something like that.
Anybody have experience and/or opinions on the Colorado? I know absolutely nothing about them, no I could join their forum to see what they all say about them.
If you've decided you want something else, I'd go get it from the dealer and do an oil/filter change then sell it to Carvana/Vroom.

You'll get a lot more for it there than a buyback from Ford as Ford will give you what you paid and current market prices are probably several thousand more than that.

Now the FL part about exchanging for a vehicle of equal value: does that mean what you paid for it or the current market prices?

As far as the Colorado, I looked at the ZR2 and wasn't really impressed.

Be sure to research the transmission issues on the 2018 and up trucks. I don't know the details of that but I've heard it can be serious.
 

Msfitoy

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Well I would say take back roads and lengthen your commute 🤷🏼‍♂️
I didn’t buy my ranger thinking about commutes. I bought it because I wanted a truck I liked and wasn’t over the top. If that’s your circumstances and you are that worried about it, I don’t know what to tell you, that’s on you. Some people are bothered when I tell them I have a truck less than 2 years old (she’ll be 2 in a week 🥲) with over 50k and think it’s the worse thing ever. If you enjoy a vehicle, you’ll put up with the little quirks it has or try to fix them yourself. Shoot my gas gauge works only 50% of the time. Am I going to take it to ford to have them completely tear apart the gas system, Hell no! I’ve Got a perfectly good odometer that tells me when I hit 350 miles and should fill up. The gas in the oil, the short commutes, not warming your truck up, it’s all little things that really have been answered probably by 10+ threads each since the ‘19 came out.
Don’t even get me started on the octane debate again. Everyone knows the damper is what doubles the horsepower after all.
Back roads through Detroit is very exciting... 😜
 

Delirious

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If you've decided you want something else, I'd go get it from the dealer and do an oil/filter change then sell it to Carvana/Vroom.

You'll get a lot more for it there than a buyback from Ford as Ford will give you what you paid and current market prices are probably several thousand more than that.

Now the FL part about exchanging for a vehicle of equal value: does that mean what you paid for it or the current market prices?

As far as the Colorado, I looked at the ZR2 and wasn't really impressed.

Be sure to research the transmission issues on the 2018 and up trucks. I don't know the details of that but I've heard it can be serious.
Thanks Adam. I'll take all that into consideration and look into it. I've just decided I'm going to stay with Ranger or Exploerer because they're my only other choices besides the F150 which I can't afford. I joined the Colorado/Canyon forum to find there are some who are switching over to the Rangers and they surely do have the transmission issues. That's enough for me.
I really hope they fix the issue on my truck. I know some here have had their issues fixed, especially having replaced the HPFP (if that's correct), so we'll see.
I think the law says replacing with a comparable priced vehicle but I can't recall at the moment. I got them on the lemon law with a Ford Explorer back in the early 2000s and they bought it back for what we paid for it -$.37 per mile driven, and then my wife went bought another one. I suppose if I knew she wanted to do that after all we would've just worked on an exchange.
Oh, one funny note is that the service manager told me they bought back an explorer because the oil pressure light always kept coming on and then they re-sold it and had to buy it back a second time. Guess they thought they had it fixed.

EDIT: I just checked with Carvana and they offered me 36,500 for it. I paid 42 for it. Confucius say, Sum Ting Wong wid dat!

First time I tried it I checked the box it said suspension modification because I did the front end lift. They only offered me 30 for it at that time. So I redid it without checking that box and got the 36 offer. Idiots.
 
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YaBoiNewton

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It's kinda early in the life of these trucks to say whether there will be issues or not. Either way, not a reason to call someone a moron. ):
Maybe on this platform specifically, but this engine has been deployed since 2015 and this topic is nothing new for eco-boost engines in general. Check google and you'll see F150 forums from ten years ago asking the same questions. Surely a solution would have come around after a decade of specific complaints if one was needed.

So yeah the name calling is out of line, but really folks are just getting paranoid about something they don't understand.
 

Crix

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no necessarily.
but you don't need to go to the extreme about it.

get an oil sample.
know exactly your percentage.
start monitoring it.
and seriously, don't be pulling the dipstick every day. once a week, once every 500 miles whatever, just stop the daily freak show on is it higher? does it smell???
if you have the coin send out a sample every 1000 miles.
if its over spec on fuel dilution, change your oil.
start monitoring every 1000 again and continue.
you might do a bunch of early oil changes....but you got some hard numbers to back up your concerns and help determine the cause.
you'll have a record of everything if your engine goes south or doesn't get better.

the soapbox with little facts attached to it wont help you
100!! first time seeing this thread i got my panties all in a bunch, was pulling dipstick constantly like hunter biden checks his crack stash , took to dealer ,they sent sample out and all is normal
 

MinuteMan

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Ford apparently doesn't talk about this much but they are assuredly aware of it.

Take it to the dealer and have them confirm.

My truck had the fuel in oil issue.

They changed oil and filter and then scribed the dipstick.

I drove it 1000 miles and brought it back.

They confirmed that the oil level was rising.

They did some impressively thorough testing and found that my HPFP was leaking.

HPFP replaced at ~4200 miles and the oil level has not risen again.
What is an HPFP?
 
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