How to Clean Intake Valves On Ford EcoBoost Engines with CRC GDI IVD® Intake Valve Cleaner

t4thfavor

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Where did you inject the crc into? Like what port or vacuum hose?
Someone above mentioned that he used the hose just before the throttle body, it could be in a different thread though, but there were pictures.





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2.7EcoBoost

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Where did you inject the crc into? Like what port or vacuum hose?
This hose pops off easily. I sprayed down into the intake tract, just held my other thumb over vacuum hose, but you could use a piece of black tape etc. to cover the vacuum if desired. The can sat on the intake tube and the sraw bent into the hole for spraying. I am going to get some (hopefully) clear fuel line, about 12"-16" that fits into the hole, that way it will be easier to spray. These cans need to be almost completely vertical, at least a little more than 45* or upside down to work properly. A 12-16"" piece oh hose sticking up from the intake tube would have made spraying much easier by giving more room. Overall, though very easy.

Vac line 1.jpg
Vac Line 2.jpg
 
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CompDude

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This hose pops off easily. I sprayed down into the intake tract, just held my other thumb over vacuum hose, but you could use a piece of black tape etc. to cover the vacuum if desired. The can sat on the intake tube and the sraw bent into the hole for spraying. I am going to get some (hopefully) clear fuel line, about 12"-16" that fits into the hole, that way it will be easier to spray. These cans need to be almost completely vertical, at least a little more than 45* or upside down to work properly. A 12-16"" piece oh hose sticking up from the intake tube would have made spraying much easier by giving more room. Overall, though very easy.
Thanks for taking time to post this!!
 

txquailguy

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I totally agree. I have just under 5k miles on my truck. Will be performing it’s first service sometime next week. Going to install an oil catch can at that time to try and extend the intake valve cleaning interval. I will not be using any type of intake valve cleaner through the engine. I will just do a walnut blast once I have an issue, hopefully around 50-60k+. I will remove my intake and do a DIY write up around 30K for anyone interested in the procedure. For the time being let’s just enjoy our Rangers. All direct injection engines suffer from this issue at some point.
Get a BIG can so you don't have to empty it ALL THE TIME...lol ;)
 

HarryD

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I would like to weigh in, agreeing with t4thfavor recommending AGAINST the use of spraying a solvent solution through the intake system!
On a normally aspirated system the downside would probably be quite low, but with a turbo the downside gets exponentially worse. The biggest problem that I see is with the turbo bearings which would get washed somewhat of the oil film that supports the shaft. The possibility of carbon chunks impacting the impeller blades is also not good.
My experience with turbos is in owning a number of Subarus (Legacy GT and a couple of WRXs) and following a couple of Subaru forums.
With the Subarus the issue was usually oil starvation due to oil supply line filters getting clogged, but bearing damage is bearing damage however it happens. When the bearings fail you get impeller to housing contact sending metal shards downstream and into the turbo oil supply line. This has a cascading effect. When you have metal fragments in the oil, it often takes out cam bearings, etc.
With all that said, I personally would rather pay the $350-$400 on occasion for walnut blasting than take the chance of catastrophic engine damage.
 

dtech

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The biggest problem that I see is with the turbo bearings which would get washed somewhat of the oil film that supports the shaft. The possibility of carbon chunks impacting the impeller blades is also not good.
I don't understand how the the turbo bearings would get washed of oil film - the bearing sits in an enclosed chamber with seals that keep the oil and water contained in the center bearing chamber, at least on turbos I've taken apart - to rebuild because over time when those seals degrade they leak oil and hence blue smoke.
I believe the premise of the cleaning solution is that it is done prior to allowing substantial buildup on the valves and it is done at periodic intervals - thus mitigating the risk of chunks of carbon breaking off. Echoing what a mechanic posted earlier in the thread a mechanic I spoke with says it (solvent cleaning) isn't very effective once the buildup becomes significant - usually with higher mileage, but he has seen only a few engines - these with high mileage where the buildup has noticeably impacted engine performance.
 

HarryD

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I believe that the turbo bearing seals are not designed for, or expecting to be subject to petroleum solvents. The seals are normally only externally exposed to air flow.
 

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