How long is your dipstick ?

Vitis805

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This is why letting the engine idle down after a long drive under load is very important.
Proper warm up and idle time is this engines best friend.
I do not want to start an argument, but this is outdated advice based on older turbocharged engines. Modern turbo DI engines do not need idle or "cool down" times anymore. It has actually been shown through statistics and data on this site and other sources that increased warm-up and idle times exacerbates the fuel in oil issue. Warm-up and idle = richer fuel mixture at lower engine temps i.e. increased fuel that won't be burned off without a subsequent load or 20 min drive.

I will say, on the other hand, these transmissions do benefit from a standing warm-up. It seems we have a choice of possible increased fuel in oil or instead possible rough shifts with these trucks. The duality of the new Ranger I suppose.
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ROBERTECOX

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so now we're having a dipstick measuring contest?
 

GregsFX2Ranger

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Depends on how the dipshit handles his dipstick! LOL
 
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Metalshift

Metalshift

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Hi I know I made a silly joke in this thread and sorry for that. I like to joke around a lot. But this caught my eye when you mentioned the crankcase. I recently got a check engine light that referenced crankcase ventilation via my Ford Pass app. "The engine control system has detected the crankcase ventilation hose sensor is reporting a signal outside of its expected value."

So I'm curious what you think.
I would suspect the pcv switching valve stuck momentarily creating a code from incorrect pressures. But many things can trip this type of code.
Clear it and see if it returns.
 

Augie81

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I would suspect the pcv switching valve stuck momentarily creating a code from incorrect pressures. But many things can trip this type of code.
Clear it and see if it returns.
Thanks. I'm going to have it cleared and see if it happens again. I appreciate your response.
 
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Metalshift

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I do not want to start an argument, but this is outdated advice based on older turbocharged engines. Modern turbo DI engines do not need idle or "cool down" times anymore. It has actually been shown through statistics and data on this site and other sources that increased warm-up and idle times exacerbates the fuel in oil issue. Warm-up and idle = richer fuel mixture at lower engine temps i.e. increased fuel that won't be burned off without a subsequent load or 20 min drive.

I will say, on the other hand, these transmissions do benefit from a standing warm-up. It seems we have a choice of possible increased fuel in oil or instead possible rough shifts with these trucks. The duality of the new Ranger I suppose.
i.e. increased fuel that won't be burned off without a subsequent load or 20 min drive.
Once again, this is false information. Most of the "burn off" occurs at idle under high vacuum and low block oil sling/cavitation. This happens when the throttle body is closed.
 

Vitis805

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Once again, this is false information. Most of the "burn off" occurs at idle under high vacuum and low block oil sling/cavitation. This happens when the throttle body is closed.
Source?

Every bit of research I have done explicitly says to do the opposite of what you say to reduce fuel dilution.

https://blog.amsoil.com/what-is-fuel-dilution-and-why-is-it-bad/

Expecting fuel to burn off at idle temperatures and at high vacuum only tells me that the PCV system is most active at sucking the unburned vapors back over my valves. This is why when you look at the catch can threads, the cans fill up fastest during winter. Lots more idling.
 
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Leftcoast

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It’s short but it’s as thick as a beer can.
 
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JeffWoodall

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But I was in the pool....
 

Dr. Zaius

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...
I have yet too see one post showing 7 quarts or more being drained, measured and photographed/certified...
The dealer drained ~7 qts only 2000 miles after an oil change on my truck. Mine was for certain caused by the HPFP as it has now been 5k plus miles and the level has not gone up.

My dealer seems to have done a pretty thorough testing of the system to find my problem, also my HPFP might have been leaking more than most and making it easier to find the issue.

Update:

Picked it up today.

Now I just have to watch it closely until my apprehension is sated.

Service.png
 
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Metalshift

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Source?

Every bit of research I have done explicitly says to do the opposite of what you say to reduce fuel dilution.

https://blog.amsoil.com/what-is-fuel-dilution-and-why-is-it-bad/

Expecting fuel to burn off at idle temperatures and at high vacuum only tells me that the PCV system is most active at sucking the unburned vapors back over my valves. This is why when you look at the catch can threads, the cans fill up fastest during winter. Lots more idling.
Maybe I'm missing your point, but this is exactly what you want happening inside a "rich" engine.

The catch cans fill up faster in the winter due to Thermal Difference and the laws of condensation.
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