Darwin Award Thread

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AzScorpion

AzScorpion

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HI Dave,

That is why I always carry a bag of Marshmallows and long handle forks...Never waste a good roaring fire....

Best,
Phil Schilke
Ranger Vehicle Engineering
Ford Motor Co. Retired
Phil,

Don't forget the chocolate for some s'mores. 😁





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Looks like someone was a little late for their oil change. o_O


I would love to know what actually caused that to happen.
 
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I would love to know what actually caused that to happen.
Me too. It looks like the oil has never been changed and maybe the car sat for a long time? Either way that's the worst seize I've seen. lol
 

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Wait, so the plastic cans held up and fenders and hood melted off? GM needs to invest in the same plastic as the cans. 🤣
As long as there is liquid in the can, the can is sealed and the boiling of the liquid does not exceed the pressure capacity of the vessel the fire will do nothing outside of catching carbon from the flames over to it.

In case of gas, when it ruptures it explodes on contact with air (as the pressurized boiling gas is already above the flame point of the solution).

Additionally there is possibility that any air in the vessel, with the evaporated gas, may cause internal explosion in the vessel. This can be prevented by filling the vessel with iron wool. In case of non-flammable liquid you can just use it to boil water.


Gas is also used as a coolant in car and rocket engines :)
 

viperwolf

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As long as there is liquid in the can, the can is sealed and the boiling of the liquid does not exceed the pressure capacity of the vessel the fire will do nothing outside of catching carbon from the flames over to it.

In case of gas, when it ruptures it explodes on contact with air (as the pressurized boiling gas is already above the flame point of the solution).

Additionally there is possibility that any air in the vessel, with the evaporated gas, may cause internal explosion in the vessel. This can be prevented by filling the vessel with iron wool. In case of non-flammable liquid you can just use it to boil water.


Gas is also used as a coolant in car and rocket engines :)
Hey hey hey :mad:
Stop that smart non sense, this is a Darwin Award thread 🧐




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RedlandRanger

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Coolant leaking to oil.
I've always seen that as creating a milkshake like liquid - I've never seen it gel like that.
 

KNI

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I've always seen that as creating a milkshake like liquid - I've never seen it gel like that.
You need slow and long leak for that to happen. Slow enough that the water in the coolant/anti-freeze mix get's vaporized without you noticing a billowing white cloud behind you and then the antifreeze chemically bonds with the oil making this gelatin-ish substance.

Too much water and you get the milkshake.
 

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I've always seen that as creating a milkshake like liquid - I've never seen it gel like that.
Honesty think it was a YouTube clicks video. No way oil will coagulate like that without residue. That engine was flushed before they added some compound that’s activated by heat. They sacrificed an engine just for laughs
 

RedlandRanger

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You need slow and long leak for that to happen. Slow enough that the water in the coolant/anti-freeze mix get's vaporized without you noticing a billowing white cloud behind you and then the antifreeze chemically bonds with the oil making this gelatin-ish substance.

Too much water and you get the milkshake.
Interesting - I've had two instances where I've had coolant in anti freeze but those were both catastrophic failures (one was a hole punched in the head itself and one was a head gasket failure).
 

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