Advertisement



Dyno - Baseline and Ford Performance Tune Numbers

OP
Ace Holliday

Ace Holliday

Well-Known Member
First Name
Scott K
Joined
Apr 19, 2020
Messages
343
Reaction score
672
Location
South Kalifornikstan
Vehicle(s)
2019 Ranger XLT Super Crew
Occupation
Aerospace Machinist/CNC Programmer - Retired
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #16
Didn’t the Ford Dyno results compare regular to premium fuel also?
I believe so. Everything I have seen suggests the 270/310 numbers are on 87 octane. Somebody needs to do a baseline run and then a 93, or 91, octane run on a stock tune. (After running the higher octane fuel for a couple of weeks.)



Advertisement



 

Bsenecal

Well-Known Member
First Name
Brian
Joined
May 21, 2020
Messages
147
Reaction score
223
Location
Milton Vermont
Vehicle(s)
2019 Ford Ranger Supercrew, 2017 Ford Fusion Sport, 1968 Ford Mustang
Occupation
Military
Ive had no less than 5 vehicles that got drop in K&N Filters the day they were purchased. All were driven daily up to 200+K before being sold. Never once did I have an issue.
I agree K&N would not still be in business if the filters didn’t work. I have had them on numerous vehicles since the 80’s.
Brian
 

Nevada_Bob

Well-Known Member
First Name
Doug
Joined
Jul 19, 2020
Messages
72
Reaction score
190
Location
New Hampshire
Vehicle(s)
2020 Lariat
I agree K&N would not still be in business if the filters didn’t work. I have had them on numerous vehicles since the 80’s.
Brian
Me too! Been using K&N for more than 25 years on all kinds of cars and street bikes, never once had an issue with grit or dirt passing through.
 

cb4017

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2020
Messages
69
Reaction score
111
Location
Northern Nevada
Vehicle(s)
2020 Ranger XLT FX4
Occupation
Retired USN and retired LEO
I reordered the Ford Performance Tune but am still on the fence about using the K&N air filter that comes with it, as some members have argued that it can allow too many particles to pass. What do you guys think? Would it be safer to flash the tune but toss the filter? Any issues with just keeping the stock filter, replacing as needed?
I for one will not use a K&N air filter on an off-road vehicle. K&N is generally associated with higher silicone numbers in UOAs.

I had a Jeep TJ Wrangler that I used a K&N filter in. This Jeep saw a lot of use on Nevada dirt roads. Went to clean the filter once and was surprised to see a fine coating of dust in the intake tube, after the filter. The filter was properly oiled and the seal greased. I went back to paper filters and never looked back.
 

slowmachine

Well-Known Member
First Name
Mike
Joined
Jul 18, 2020
Messages
260
Reaction score
393
Location
New Hampshire
Vehicle(s)
2020 Ranger Lariat SuperCrew 4x4
I for one will not use a K&N air filter on an off-road vehicle. K&N is generally associated with higher silicone numbers in UOAs.

I had a Jeep TJ Wrangler that I used a K&N filter in. This Jeep saw a lot of use on Nevada dirt roads. Went to clean the filter once and was surprised to see a fine coating of dust in the intake tube, after the filter. The filter was properly oiled and the seal greased. I went back to paper filters and never looked back.
My experience is the same in the Southwest desert. You really need a pre-filter with the oiled gauze filters, but then you’re back to the same amount of airflow restriction as the paper filter. Aside from some extreme off-road usage, with a pre-filter, I would never use one. For street use, it’s the Slick 50 of air filters - 100% marketing hype. If you really need more airflow, it’s almost always better to increase the surface area than to decrease the filter efficiency.
 

Advertisement






Advertisement






Advertisement


Top