Tire Pressure ?

Big Blue

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I know many people will know this, but I haven't seen it mentioned lately. When looking at tire pressures for tires other than stock size you need to look at the new size and remember how the sizing works. The first number in the size is normally the width in mm (or cross section of the tire), the second is the height of the sidewall as a percentage of the width. This does not apply to tires listed by diameter and width. So if you go to a wider tire, regardless of sidewall height, you have a larger contact patch with the road (more square inches). This can lead to a lower pressure to carry the same load. Yes LT rated tires tend to call for higher pressures than P rated tires, this is because they are intended for higher loads. As has been said the door sticker only applies to the tire that came with the truck as specified on the sticker. Even then it is a starting point, and based on your usage may need to be adjusted to achieve even wear. Seems like the best way to answer this is to get the axle weights for your truck and go to the manufacturers tables for the tire and size your running and see what they recommend. anything else is trial and error.
 

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I’m running the stock Bridgestone H/T’s in 18”. Door sticker says run 35psi and I’ve done so, I’ve also rotated them every 5k and had them re-balance 3 times.

All four are worn thinner in the center and are now right at the wear bar. I have one tire that is past the wear bar in the center. Coming up on 27K miles.

At 25K I rotated and dropped the psi to 32, rides much better. Two tires have plugs in them too.

I will be getting new tires before winter but probably should replace them now. I would if I were traveling but it’s mostly city driving. I’ll most likely replace them with Michelin’s or similar. I’m 95% on road use.
I'm assuming you mean your tires were patched, but if they actually have plugs you should take them in to be removed and patched asap. Discount tire will patch them for free, though I am unsure if them being at the wear bars will make a difference.

Plugs are fine as a temporary/emergency solution, but can come out so should not be used long term.

(Once again, I am assuming your tires were properly patched and you knew all of this, but didn't want to not tell you based on that assumption)
 
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JACKSMYDOG

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My factory tires are Hankooks 265/65-18. As noted by others, the door sticker is only relevant to the factory built tires.
sLi6WmF.jpg


Also as noted, recommended PSI is relevant to the load. If you buy a factory built cab/chassis vs a fully built truck on the exact same rim/tire combo, the door sticker will have different PSI listed for both.

My truck is now on LT 285/70-17, the sidewall lists 3195Lbs max load at 65 psi. That's about 2.5x the actual load on my truck, so I run them @ 38psi.
 
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JACKSMYDOG

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I'm assuming you mean your tires were patched, but if they actually have plugs you should take them in to be removed and patched asap. Discount tire will patch them for free, though I am unsure if them being at the wear bars will make a difference.

Plugs are fine as a temporary/emergency solution, but can come out so should not be used long term.

(Once again, I am assuming your tires were properly patched and you knew all of this, but didn't want to not tell you based on that assumption)
I have installed ~thousands of tires plugs in my life, and never, ever, had a complaint with one.

At least 50 on my own vehicles over 35 years and never had a problem with any of them. Ever.

I've heard many make the claim plugs are not safe, and yet to meet anyone who has had an actual plug failure.

With that said, there are allot of wingnuts out there. I ripped a 1 inch slice through the tread on a tire, literally 2 hours from starting a 4,000 mile road trip home. I stopped at a used shop for a temp replacement to get back home, buddy comes out of the back 30 minutes later with 6 plugs in the now, oval tire and tells me to use it as the spare and not my primary tire.

LMAO.... Can I speak to your manager please....
 

Bludrok

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I have installed ~thousands of tires plugs in my life, and never, ever, had a complaint with one.

At least 50 on my own vehicles over 35 years and never had a problem with any of them. Ever.

I've heard many make the claim plugs are not safe, and yet to meet anyone who has had an actual plug failure.

With that said, there are allot of wingnuts out there. I ripped a 1 inch slice through the tread on a tire, literally 2 hours from starting a 4,000 mile road trip home. I stopped at a used shop for a temp replacement to get back home, buddy comes out of the back 30 minutes later with 6 plugs in the now, oval tire and tells me to use it as the spare and not my primary tire.

LMAO.... Can I speak to your manager please....
Yup, my experience is about the same. Since you can get it repaired for free though, why chance it?
 
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JACKSMYDOG

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Yup, my experience is about the same. Since you can get it repaired for free though, why chance it?
Nothing is free, lol.

If I felt a plug was unsafe, I would have it replaced ASAP.

Assuming a plug is safe, the question becomes is my truck safer in my driveway, or with someone else driving/working on it. I prefer the former.
 

kieefer

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I'm assuming you mean your tires were patched, but if they actually have plugs you should take them in to be removed and patched asap. Discount tire will patch them for free, though I am unsure if them being at the wear bars will make a difference.

Plugs are fine as a temporary/emergency solution, but can come out so should not be used long term.

(Once again, I am assuming your tires were properly patched and you knew all of this, but didn't want to not tell you based on that assumption)
Don't assume anything.
I've run plenty of tires with plugs in them, motorcycle tires too.......OH MY GAWD!!!
I appreciate your concern though.
 
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CHS

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I know many people will know this, but I haven't seen it mentioned lately. When looking at tire pressures for tires other than stock size you need to look at the new size and remember how the sizing works. The first number in the size is normally the width in mm (or cross section of the tire), the second is the height of the sidewall as a percentage of the width. This does not apply to tires listed by diameter and width. So if you go to a wider tire, regardless of sidewall height, you have a larger contact patch with the road (more square inches). This can lead to a lower pressure to carry the same load. Yes LT rated tires tend to call for higher pressures than P rated tires, this is because they are intended for higher loads. As has been said the door sticker only applies to the tire that came with the truck as specified on the sticker. Even then it is a starting point, and based on your usage may need to be adjusted to achieve even wear. Seems like the best way to answer this is to get the axle weights for your truck and go to the manufacturers tables for the tire and size your running and see what they recommend. anything else is trial and error.
I weighed my truck at a Cat Scale. Full tank of fuel (108 LBS) Nothing else.
Front. 2,629
Rear. 2,000
Total. 4,620 LBS
- the 108 LBS for fuel = 4,512 LBS

That said, I have the Hankook 265/60-18's and keep my pressure at 40 LBS.
Had it at the sticker pressure of 32, and was good, BUT. I use it as a 4 wheel tow vehicle at times.
I usually get 8 MPG with the E450 Class C motorhome when I pulled my Jeep Wrangler (weight was similar) . When I pulled the Ranger, I got 6 MPG. I raised it up to 45 LBS and got back my 8 MPG. Tire is rated for 51 LBS cold pressure so I'm good. Tire is not wearing abnormally and will probably up my MPG too.
I went to a conference a few years back and there was a tech guy from Michelin that told us that the tire and auto companies come up with the tire pressures partially based on ride comfort, so if you was longer tire life go up with the pressures, as long as you don't go higher than the Max tire pressure at cold your OK (as far as tire safety is concerned) . If you want mostly comfort go with the door sticker.
 

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There are plug kits using the strips, and then there are plug kits like this, the Stop N Go Plug Kit.
Have used it for years, on everything from motorcycle tires to 10 ply motor home tires, and have never had one fail. I keep one in all my vehicles along with a compressor able to handle that vehicles tire pressure needs.

shopping.png
 

CHS

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There are plug kits using the strips, and then there are plug kits like this, the Stop N Go Plug Kit.
Have used it for years, on everything from motorcycle tires to 10 ply motor home tires, and have never had one fail. I keep one in all my vehicles along with a compressor able to handle that vehicles tire pressure needs.

shopping.png
i've always use the rope type on small and large trucks and cars. Never any issues of failure. Also keep a kit on in my car/truck and Motorcycle (Motorcycle is only for emergencies. Never repaired one yet, but would probably replace the tire afterwards)
 

JACKSMYDOG

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I had never seen the Stop-n-Go plug before. I watched a few videos, and it is interesting but I don't see anything notably better than a folded rubber, or folded cord plug.

Also no bonding agent for the S_N_G?
 
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Chuck Lau

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I had never seen the Stop-n-Go plug before. I watched a few videos, and it is interesting but I don't see anything notably better than a folded rubber, or folded cord plug.

Also no bonding agent for the S_N_G?
I have had trucks ALL my life with GOOD tire Wear Always....Run...35 Pounds all Four tires year around....Check them every two weeks.
 
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Josebd

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I set mine at 35 pounds but on my ford app it shows 40 pounds?
 
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