Ranger Suspension, Lift Kits, Leveling Kits

Discussion in 'Suspension / Chassis' started by Andy, Oct 31, 2018.

  1. Andy

    Andy Well-Known Member

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    #1 Oct 31, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2018
    I would like to use this thread to list and discuss the available suspension lift kits on the 2019 Ranger.
     
  2. OP
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    Andy

    Andy Well-Known Member

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    Dan Ordoins and AnimeRanger87 like this.
  3. NY35

    NY35 Active Member

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    Icon Vehicle Dynamics makes some seriously quality suspension kits, I've experienced their stuff for the Jeep Wrangler. The Baja Forged Ranger from SEMA that admin posted has an Icon suspension lift kit.

    From this thread: https://www.ranger5g.com/forum/threads/baja-forged-ranger-2018-sema-r5g-coverage.1249/

     
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  4. OP
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    Andy

    Andy Well-Known Member

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    Yeah im excited to see that suspension kit available. Hopefully we don't have to wait to long to get our hands on a set.
     
  5. StAugKid

    StAugKid Well-Known Member

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    I'm just worried how a lift and big tires are going to be with the 2.3L. I've driven lifted trucks before, but always with a diesel or big V8 to push those heavy tires around.
     
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  6. OP
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    Andy

    Andy Well-Known Member

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    #6 Nov 4, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2018
    Think about a Tacoma with less power and no turbo to makeup for higher altitude and four less gears. Lots of Tacoma guys seem to do just fine so I think the ranger will do just fine as well.

    The 2.3 in these trucks is de-tuned quite a bit so if you are willing to run 91 and tune it there is definitely a lot of power left on the table. For comparison the 2.3 in the focus RS is rated a 345hp and 347tq with a fuel requirement of 91 octane. The 2.3 in the ranger is built with a bigger turbo and larger oil cooler with a few other slight improvements. To say the 2.3 in the ranger could easily match and beat the focus RS is more than likely on 91. Just my opinion though.
     
  7. FordBlueHeart

    FordBlueHeart Well-Known Member

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    Tacoma guys will never admit their truck is underpowered. They deflect by changing the subject to resale value.:crazy:
     
  8. StAugKid

    StAugKid Well-Known Member

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    I drove a Tacoma TRD off road and it was painfully slow. I know the ecoboost will have considerably more torque, I just hope it will be enough. The Ranger weighs almost as much as the F150 but it's short on horsepower compared to the 2.7, 5.0 and 3.5L engines. A tune will definitely be in the cards. I'm lucky to live in Florida so 93+ octane is everywhere and we are right at sea level.
     
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  9. rduvall

    rduvall Well-Known Member

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    The only trucks that feel the same stock vs lifted are the Canyon/Colorado Diesel and the Nissan Frontier.
    • The Canyon/Colorado diesel feels fantastic lifted due to all the torque and actually starts to roll in idle when you take your foot off the brake. This truck actually felt better lifted than it did stock which wasn't what I was expecting.
    •The Frontier has a higher rear gear ratio which is needed as it has the lowest torque in the grouping. It also easily has the lowest fuel economy in the group. This thing is just a blast to drive lifted.

    That said, the rear gearing on the Ranger will determine more about how it feels lifted than anything. The Canyon/Colorado V6 starts to feel sluggish lifted and the 2.3L in the Ranger is pretty much on par from a torque standpoint. That said, it also won't take as much lift with a Ranger to fit the same tires as the higher lifts on other vehicles. This reduces weight which plays into it a bit as well.
     
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  10. Xfitter

    Xfitter Active Member

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    Curious why the Ranger will be able fit the same tires as other vehicles with less of a lift? Does it have more fender clearance from the factory than the competitors?
     
  11. FordBlueHeart

    FordBlueHeart Well-Known Member

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    It could be a multitude of reasons. From larger wheel well openings to different backspacing or offset of the wheel. All of these can determine how big a tire and wheel will fit.
     
  12. j0shm1lls

    j0shm1lls Well-Known Member

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    The BDS kit can be seen in this video at 1:55.

     
  13. FordBlueHeart

    FordBlueHeart Well-Known Member

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    I guess I didn't realize BDS was here in Michigan. Good stuff. :thumbsup:
     
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  14. pannwfn

    pannwfn Well-Known Member

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    OK I don't want a jacked truck only leveled but I want 31 10.5 BFGs the same as my 2005 fx4 level 2 not Handcock's and yes I know how to spell it correctly any help.
     
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  15. rduvall

    rduvall Well-Known Member

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    Wheel wells are usually the largest determining factor. For instance, an F-150 with 6 inches of lift can easily fit 35s with no rubbing. The same year GM 1500 will require 7 inches of lift and some front bumper valance trimming to fit 35s without rubbing.

    There are also other issues such as wheel/tire width and wheel offset that play into the equation as well.
     

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