Predictable increase of backcountry motor vehicle issues

dtech

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Excerpts below taken from an article in Saturday's Denver Post about the increasing no of issues caused by off road vehicles in CO. I decided to make the post because I just spent 5 days on a camping trip and one day hiked to an alpine lake to fish which is accessible only by very rugged off road vehicles - the amount of trash seen along the route was disturbing - water bottles, beer cans, broken glass, and much more trash along the shore of the lake. So wife and I are enjoying some quiet time fishing the lake - the only ones there - when in the distance we hear music playing and it gets increasing louder until we see one of those 4 passenger Razors appear, the occupants blasting music and drinking beer . And some of these off roaders are pushing for more access into wilderness areas where all forms of wheeled vehicles are banned. Having spent a good deal of time in CO backcountry over the past 40 yrs it's sad to see the increasing misuse/abuse of the backcountry but predictable given all of the off road vehicles widely available today. There's really not a whole lot to be done to stop this save for increased closure of off road vehicle access but the miscreants know there is little chance of being caught should they disregard the rules, a closed to vehicular traffic sign at a road doesn't do much to prevent transgressions I've seen increasingly formidable barricades erected by the forest service. Really just another sign of the times we live in today where too many people care about themselves and feel entitled to freely disregard rules designed to protect the backcountry. And I'm seeing a huge number of these Razors and like vehicles everywhere. End of my social commentary, pls be considerate of others using the backcountry and haul out your trash.

" That day, Voorhis’ team was tending to two incidents in which drivers found themselves in precarious situations. The first made national news after a driver accidentally climbed a hiking trail toward Mount Lincoln, one of Colorado’s famous 14ers, in Park County. The white GMC Canyon truck got stuck in the alpine scree on its way to the 14,295-foot summit. The second happened on Mosquito Pass where the driver of a red truck went off trail and rolled the vehicle down a mountain slope near hikers, who captured the incident on video. Both situations underscore a troubling trend in Colorado where the number of drivers who break the rules of the backcountry — deliberately or not — is on the rise. “Illegal motorized use is probably our No. 1 recreational problem right now,” Voorhis said. “It’s only gotten worse over the last 10 years.”"

" The cost of retrieving the truck near the top of Mount Lincoln set the driver back $3,500, Stubblefield said, on top of the fine. Still, remediating the damage and educating drivers on the rules of the mountain roads falls to Voorhis’ team, which manages about half a million acres of backcountry. “A lot of our recreational budget now goes to working to prevent illegal motorized (use). So that means there’s less money for trails, less money for campgrounds, and less money for other things,” he said. "
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RDJTX

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I look at people getting caught like the two mentioned, like I view people who refuse to evacuate when a hurricane hits. Leave them where they are and leave then to get themselves out of trouble. If they kill themselves leave the bodies as a warning to the next asshole who may think about engaging in the same stupidity. I have exactly zero shits to give about people who engage in this stuff
 

mtbikernate

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this is why there are precious few places in the eastern US to drive off-road on public lands. this is a very old problem. it's sad that it's such an old problem.

22yrs ago I was an intern on a USFS district that had some off-road trails. there were a few weekends every summer where it was all-hands-on-deck. EVERY single USFS staffer in the office went to the area with those off-road trails to manage those users because so many would otherwise show up and just tear the place to hell (and burn the place down - one big job was checking for spark arrestors on the vehicles required to have them).
 

puckdodger

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Does "people suck" apply in this situation? I think so.
 


Bob902

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If I may, if you are out hiking, please use ear buds for your music. You don't need to carry a Bluetooth speaker. Not everyone enjoys your loud music. Some of us enjoy the quiet and serenity of the hike.
 
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dtech

dtech

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this is why there are precious few places in the eastern US to drive off-road on public lands. this is a very old problem. it's sad that it's such an old problem.

22yrs ago I was an intern on a USFS district that had some off-road trails. there were a few weekends every summer where it was all-hands-on-deck. EVERY single USFS staffer in the office went to the area with those off-road trails to manage those users because so many would otherwise show up and just tear the place to hell (and burn the place down - one big job was checking for spark arrestors on the vehicles required to have them).
I often chat with the forest service employees, most are very accommodating and many are frustrated by having to become more into enforcement and cleanup than other duties. The quote from the article mentions how having to repair and cleanup takes away monies for other projects such as expanding/upgrading campgrounds and trails. I used to occasionally call out the miscreants for their behavior but no more because one risks a physical confrontation or getting shot. Just so many more people have access now to the backcountry and with that comes a good many that don't care. Just glad I enjoyed the backcountry for decades before a lot of the issues became commonplace.
 

Friday yet?

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Excerpts below taken from an article in Saturday's Denver Post about the increasing no of issues caused by off road vehicles in CO. I decided to make the post because I just spent 5 days on a camping trip and one day hiked to an alpine lake to fish which is accessible only by very rugged off road vehicles - the amount of trash seen along the route was disturbing - water bottles, beer cans, broken glass, and much more trash along the shore of the lake. So wife and I are enjoying some quiet time fishing the lake - the only ones there - when in the distance we hear music playing and it gets increasing louder until we see one of those 4 passenger Razors appear, the occupants blasting music and drinking beer . And some of these off roaders are pushing for more access into wilderness areas where all forms of wheeled vehicles are banned. Having spent a good deal of time in CO backcountry over the past 40 yrs it's sad to see the increasing misuse/abuse of the backcountry but predictable given all of the off road vehicles widely available today. There's really not a whole lot to be done to stop this save for increased closure of off road vehicle access but the miscreants know there is little chance of being caught should they disregard the rules, a closed to vehicular traffic sign at a road doesn't do much to prevent transgressions I've seen increasingly formidable barricades erected by the forest service. Really just another sign of the times we live in today where too many people care about themselves and feel entitled to freely disregard rules designed to protect the backcountry. And I'm seeing a huge number of these Razors and like vehicles everywhere. End of my social commentary, pls be considerate of others using the backcountry and haul out your trash.

" That day, Voorhis’ team was tending to two incidents in which drivers found themselves in precarious situations. The first made national news after a driver accidentally climbed a hiking trail toward Mount Lincoln, one of Colorado’s famous 14ers, in Park County. The white GMC Canyon truck got stuck in the alpine scree on its way to the 14,295-foot summit. The second happened on Mosquito Pass where the driver of a red truck went off trail and rolled the vehicle down a mountain slope near hikers, who captured the incident on video. Both situations underscore a troubling trend in Colorado where the number of drivers who break the rules of the backcountry — deliberately or not — is on the rise. “Illegal motorized use is probably our No. 1 recreational problem right now,” Voorhis said. “It’s only gotten worse over the last 10 years.”"

" The cost of retrieving the truck near the top of Mount Lincoln set the driver back $3,500, Stubblefield said, on top of the fine. Still, remediating the damage and educating drivers on the rules of the mountain roads falls to Voorhis’ team, which manages about half a million acres of backcountry. “A lot of our recreational budget now goes to working to prevent illegal motorized (use). So that means there’s less money for trails, less money for campgrounds, and less money for other things,” he said. "
+1
Major league +1

All the asshats and their trash in the beautiful outdoors absolutely infuriates me.
 

Awg9Tech

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Excerpts below taken from an article in Saturday's Denver Post about the increasing no of issues caused by off road vehicles in CO. I decided to make the post because I just spent 5 days on a camping trip and one day hiked to an alpine lake to fish which is accessible only by very rugged off road vehicles - the amount of trash seen along the route was disturbing - water bottles, beer cans, broken glass, and much more trash along the shore of the lake. So wife and I are enjoying some quiet time fishing the lake - the only ones there - when in the distance we hear music playing and it gets increasing louder until we see one of those 4 passenger Razors appear, the occupants blasting music and drinking beer . And some of these off roaders are pushing for more access into wilderness areas where all forms of wheeled vehicles are banned. Having spent a good deal of time in CO backcountry over the past 40 yrs it's sad to see the increasing misuse/abuse of the backcountry but predictable given all of the off road vehicles widely available today. There's really not a whole lot to be done to stop this save for increased closure of off road vehicle access but the miscreants know there is little chance of being caught should they disregard the rules, a closed to vehicular traffic sign at a road doesn't do much to prevent transgressions I've seen increasingly formidable barricades erected by the forest service. Really just another sign of the times we live in today where too many people care about themselves and feel entitled to freely disregard rules designed to protect the backcountry. And I'm seeing a huge number of these Razors and like vehicles everywhere. End of my social commentary, pls be considerate of others using the backcountry and haul out your trash.

" That day, Voorhis’ team was tending to two incidents in which drivers found themselves in precarious situations. The first made national news after a driver accidentally climbed a hiking trail toward Mount Lincoln, one of Colorado’s famous 14ers, in Park County. The white GMC Canyon truck got stuck in the alpine scree on its way to the 14,295-foot summit. The second happened on Mosquito Pass where the driver of a red truck went off trail and rolled the vehicle down a mountain slope near hikers, who captured the incident on video. Both situations underscore a troubling trend in Colorado where the number of drivers who break the rules of the backcountry — deliberately or not — is on the rise. “Illegal motorized use is probably our No. 1 recreational problem right now,” Voorhis said. “It’s only gotten worse over the last 10 years.”"

" The cost of retrieving the truck near the top of Mount Lincoln set the driver back $3,500, Stubblefield said, on top of the fine. Still, remediating the damage and educating drivers on the rules of the mountain roads falls to Voorhis’ team, which manages about half a million acres of backcountry. “A lot of our recreational budget now goes to working to prevent illegal motorized (use). So that means there’s less money for trails, less money for campgrounds, and less money for other things,” he said. "
This is why we can’t have nice things.
 
 



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