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MBRP Black series cat back exhaust

Mauro O

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Hows it going everyone? I just installed my MBRP exhaust and posted a video to youtube to anyone who is curious. Feel free to ask any questions. I got it on sale from the cjponey parts off road. Around 450 which isnt too bad. Install was done in the ground no lift but the removal of the old exhaust was hard to take out, had to angle it a lot to slide out. I got frustrated and didnt show the install just the removal. I also looked up coupons codes for the cj website and got like a 10% off code which helped with shipping. The exhaust to me sounds way better then stock and not obnoxious in any way. I did already see a increase in MPG which was surprising. Thanks again, new here so I'm not sure how to post correctly.



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FULLSCALE

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I skipped to the end to hear it but it sounds pretty good!
 

P. A. Schilke

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Hi Folks,

Here is my take on this type of exhaust "upgrade". There is a very expensive flex coupling in the OEM system. This is done for NVH reasons. Mostly vibratory noise generation. The exhaust is like a tuning fork that produces vibrations that transmit into the cab of the truck and make all sorts of buzzes, rattles etc. The flex coupling decouples the tuning fork as the Natural Frequency of the exhaust is lowered to below engine excitation. This aftermarket system eliminates this, which is bad news for every sort of NVH except exhaust sound... I can only imagine the NVH degradation this "mod" did to the poor Ranger.

If you like to upgrade your exhaust and choose to suffer the deterioration in NVH, have at! Not for me, as I spent half my Ford Career as an NVH technical specialist.and to defeat this aspect is saddening...

Guess I carpped in quite a few lunchboxes...

Best,
Phil Schilke
Ranger Vehicle Engineering
Ford Motor Co. Retired
 
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Mauro O

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Hi Folks,

Here is my take on this type of exhaust "upgrade". There is a very expensive flex coupling in the OEM system. This is done for NVH reasons. Mostly vibratory noise generation. The exhaust is like a tuning fork that produces vibrations that transmit into the cab of the truck and make all sorts of buzzes, rattles etc. The flex coupling decouples the tuning fork as the Natural Frequency of the exhaust is lowered to below engine excitation. This aftermarket system eliminates this, which is bad news for every sort of NVH except exhaust sound... I can only imagine the NVH degradation this "mod" did to the poor Ranger.

If you like to upgrade your exhaust and choose to suffer the deterioration in NVH, have at! Not for me, as I spent half my Ford Career as an NVH technical specialist.and to defeat this aspect is saddening...

Guess I carpped in quite a few lunchboxes...

Best,
Phil Schilke
Ranger Vehicle Engineering
Ford Motor Co. Retired
What makes car/truck culture unique is that we can make our vehicle our own custom thing. I mean so far it runs better then then stock and yes Ford designs things to be optimal but doesnt mean there isnt room for improvement. I like it so far, no vibrations at all. I appreciate the feed back though I'm open to it
 

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Hi Folks,

Here is my take on this type of exhaust "upgrade". There is a very expensive flex coupling in the OEM system. This is done for NVH reasons. Mostly vibratory noise generation. The exhaust is like a tuning fork that produces vibrations that transmit into the cab of the truck and make all sorts of buzzes, rattles etc. The flex coupling decouples the tuning fork as the Natural Frequency of the exhaust is lowered to below engine excitation. This aftermarket system eliminates this, which is bad news for every sort of NVH except exhaust sound... I can only imagine the NVH degradation this "mod" did to the poor Ranger.

If you like to upgrade your exhaust and choose to suffer the deterioration in NVH, have at! Not for me, as I spent half my Ford Career as an NVH technical specialist.and to defeat this aspect is saddening...

Guess I carpped in quite a few lunchboxes...

Best,
Phil Schilke
Ranger Vehicle Engineering
Ford Motor Co. Retired

Phil,

Forgive my ignorance on the topic but are you referring to the awful "drone" heard in the cabin? Do you know if different manufacturers account for this? Magnaflow/Borla/etc for instance?

From personal experience I have had migraine causing drone from some teenage driveway builds. I had a very expensive and supoer custom Flowmaster on my old 4.6L F150 and the cabin noise was insignificant.... The tailpipes however, significant!
 

Msfitoy

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Hows it going everyone? I just installed my MBRP exhaust and posted a video to youtube to anyone who is curious. Feel free to ask any questions. I got it on sale from the cjponey parts off road. Around 450 which isnt too bad. Install was done in the ground no lift but the removal of the old exhaust was hard to take out, had to angle it a lot to slide out. I got frustrated and didnt show the install just the removal. I also looked up coupons codes for the cj website and got like a 10% off code which helped with shipping. The exhaust to me sounds way better then stock and not obnoxious in any way. I did already see a increase in MPG which was surprising. Thanks again, new here so I'm not sure how to post correctly.
That's what I have:like:
 

Msfitoy

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Hi Folks,

Here is my take on this type of exhaust "upgrade". There is a very expensive flex coupling in the OEM system. This is done for NVH reasons. Mostly vibratory noise generation. The exhaust is like a tuning fork that produces vibrations that transmit into the cab of the truck and make all sorts of buzzes, rattles etc. The flex coupling decouples the tuning fork as the Natural Frequency of the exhaust is lowered to below engine excitation. This aftermarket system eliminates this, which is bad news for every sort of NVH except exhaust sound... I can only imagine the NVH degradation this "mod" did to the poor Ranger.

If you like to upgrade your exhaust and choose to suffer the deterioration in NVH, have at! Not for me, as I spent half my Ford Career as an NVH technical specialist.and to defeat this aspect is saddening...

Guess I carpped in quite a few lunchboxes...

Best,
Phil Schilke
Ranger Vehicle Engineering
Ford Motor Co. Retired
Hi Phil...I have the MBRP for many thousand miles and haven't noticed any deterioration of NVH...maybe I have the music up too loud LOL...my concern is whether the direct connection would cause undue stress on the down pipe which I assume is rigidly mounted to the engine...the exhaust is rather mellow and during normal driving, isn't really noticeable...until WOT:like:
 
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Mauro O

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Phil,

Forgive my ignorance on the topic but are you referring to the awful "drone" heard in the cabin? Do you know if different manufacturers account for this? Magnaflow/Borla/etc for instance?

From personal experience I have had migraine causing drone from some teenage driveway builds. I had a very expensive and supoer custom Flowmaster on my old 4.6L F150 and the cabin noise was insignificant.... The tailpipes however, significant!
There isnt any drone that's unbearable or unbalanced, it's a deeper tone that gives it more of a truck feel. There isnt any crazy vibrations it just sounds like a engineer point of view but you got take into account the aftermarket companies also take these things into account as well and design there things in mind as well. There are other exhaust that aren't tame at all bit this one I feel is a good balance.
 

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Hell yeah man I love it!
Do you think it's pretty low key? I can't barely hear it inside...I'm thinking of experimenting with a straight pipe (no muffler) and see what that sounds like since the turbo is soaking up most of the noise.
 
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Mauro O

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Do you think it's pretty low key? I can't barely hear it inside...I'm thinking of experimenting with a straight pipe (no muffler) and see what that sounds like since the turbo is soaking up most of the noise.
It for sure isnt the loudest exhaust out there but for the price it's really well done and better then stock. Maybe a down pipe would open it up even more but they are expensive. They have cated down pipes
 

rmr76

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I have the MBRP on my Ranger as well (aluminized, not black although I did plasti-dip the tip in black). I think it sounds good, but I wouldn't mind it a bit louder either. No drone or added NVH that I can really tell and it's not obnoxious like many 4 cylinders sound Frankly, I thought the factory exhaust was way too quiet. This is a truck, not a luxury car. But, I like to hear my cars. I replaced the factory exhaust on my previous F150 and on the Mustang GT I had before that. But, I respect Ford shoots for a wide market where quiet is the norm. At least we have aftermarket options!
 

LIMITY

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I too have an MBRP, 3" installer series. I like the MBRP because you only hear it when you accelerate. Which the first couple times I had it in Sport mode and I took off, with the accompanying sound, scared the hell out of me.
 

P. A. Schilke

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Hi Phil...I have the MBRP for many thousand miles and haven't noticed any deterioration of NVH...maybe I have the music up too loud LOL...my concern is whether the direct connection would cause undue stress on the down pipe which I assume is rigidly mounted to the engine...the exhaust is rather mellow and during normal driving, isn't really noticeable...until WOT:like:
The OEM System with the flex coupling was probably not for structural reasons but NVH is more than likely. The flex coupling is quite expensive so the development engineers must have had a huge problem. Most program managers would not agree to a flex coupling unless the program was in dire straits. Just my opinion..think structurally you are okay. The problem is that the natural frequency resonance is the square root of the stiffness over the mass. You are fighting this square root radical which means that large changes in stiffness, for example, move the needle very little. For example lets say you increased stiffness from 2 to 4...a 200% increase in stiffness take the square root of 2 is 1.41 and 4 is 2 so comparing 1.4 to 2...the needle only moved about 14%. The flex coupling is a huge reduction in system stiffness so the gains in NVH can be quite large if needed for the program.

best,
Phil Schilke
Ranger Vehicle Engineering
Ford Motor Co. Retired
 

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