Cruising at 2300-2500rpm - better mpg but any cons?

joseywales

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Hey all!
I was searching the threads for this but could not really find anything in relation to this particular question. As this is may be an odd question

So we all know about our Rangers and their LUGGING issues, especially in 9th/10th gear.

I have an Eibach Coilover suspension package, so about 3.5" level up front, stock rear height. Leveled out the truck nicely
And also running 33" tires (32.7"). Which does not help the lugging issue or transmission shift points

I don't have a tune, I'm looking to keep the warranty for a few more years so I'm thinking about going with FP just to get some extra power and maybe a little mpg back from the oversized tires and brush guard/winch combo haha

I have been trying to defeat this lugging issue and have been playing around with locking out gears
At highway speeds, 75-80mph I have been locking out gear 10, so in 9th gear I'm around 2000rpm, decreased lugging and slightly better gas mileage
City speeds about 45-50mph been running gear 7 at about the same rpm (~2000)

I decided to push it a little further - at highway speeds been using 8th gear, cruising about 2500-2600 around 76-80mph and I've seen a bump in gas mileage, cruising at that rpm range. I've gained 1.5-2mpg and lugging is basically nonexistent. City speeds ~50mph been cruising in 6th gear about 2400-2500 rpm as well with increased gas mileage of about the same.

Guess my question is if that will hinder anything down the road, long term? I don't know much about the A10 trans, I've been an old school, good ole boy-backyard mechanic for many years. Most of my previous (older cars) would run about that rpm range if not higher at those speeds. With the A10 its been a learning experience. As of my very little knowledge about the A10 trans, are they meant to cruise at those lower rpm? I did not know if any of you had knowledge if cruising at those rpm ranges long term would cause excessive heat or wear and tear etc? Not like I'm cruising at 4500-5000 or anything, i know 2000-2500 is not that high by any means, but from what I've experienced with this transmission, if I allowed it to do its thing from factory, it will always try and cruise at 1000rpm if it could 🤣 lug lug lug.

Thank you all for reading my noob, convoluted rant. Any information provided is always welcomed with open arms and no offense will be taken if jabs are thrown my way for this question.

Happy Lugging!
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RANGER PRIDE

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well, just guessing here (and probably going to twitch the panties of some people who will have their opposing views)....you're higher rpm's could achieve and extra 30000000 strokes over an average lifetime on the vehicle so that equates to more wear and tear of the engine and its components.
the trade off is there....which side of the fence is better?
you might have solved the lugging concerns about early engine death, but you gave it a death sentence anyway on the higher wear over time.
 

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Hey all!
I was searching the threads for this but could not really find anything in relation to this particular question. As this is may be an odd question

So we all know about our Rangers and their LUGGING issues, especially in 9th/10th gear.

I have an Eibach Coilover suspension package, so about 3.5" level up front, stock rear height. Leveled out the truck nicely
And also running 33" tires (32.7"). Which does not help the lugging issue or transmission shift points

I don't have a tune, I'm looking to keep the warranty for a few more years so I'm thinking about going with FP just to get some extra power and maybe a little mpg back from the oversized tires and brush guard/winch combo haha

I have been trying to defeat this lugging issue and have been playing around with locking out gears
At highway speeds, 75-80mph I have been locking out gear 10, so in 9th gear I'm around 2000rpm, decreased lugging and slightly better gas mileage
City speeds about 45-50mph been running gear 7 at about the same rpm (~2000)

I decided to push it a little further - at highway speeds been using 8th gear, cruising about 2500-2600 around 76-80mph and I've seen a bump in gas mileage, cruising at that rpm range. I've gained 1.5-2mpg and lugging is basically nonexistent. City speeds ~50mph been cruising in 6th gear about 2400-2500 rpm as well with increased gas mileage of about the same.

Guess my question is if that will hinder anything down the road, long term? I don't know much about the A10 trans, I've been an old school, good ole boy-backyard mechanic for many years. Most of my previous (older cars) would run about that rpm range if not higher at those speeds. With the A10 its been a learning experience. As of my very little knowledge about the A10 trans, are they meant to cruise at those lower rpm? I did not know if any of you had knowledge if cruising at those rpm ranges long term would cause excessive heat or wear and tear etc? Not like I'm cruising at 4500-5000 or anything, i know 2000-2500 is not that high by any means, but from what I've experienced with this transmission, if I allowed it to do its thing from factory, it will always try and cruise at 1000rpm if it could 🤣 lug lug lug.

Thank you all for reading my noob, convoluted rant. Any information provided is always welcomed with open arms and no offense will be taken if jabs are thrown my way for this question.

Happy Lugging!
With those big tires try Sport mode :)
 

wanted33

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I wouldn't think there would be any problems. Our Rangers has the 10R80 10 spd, so it has a higher torque rating. With that it's designed to tow, and when your towing the max at 7500 lbs I expect the rpms would be higher most of the time. Of course that's SWAG (Scientific wild ass guess) :)
 
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Langwilliams

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I noticed my truck in drive cruises around 1400 in D around town. I think this is too low but sport mode is 2500-2600 which I think is too high. I tried tow mode tow mode an it's good but I worry about all the engine breaking being extra wear on the transmission. Most times I just leave it in drive on short trips but try either tow mode or locking out 7th up if I'm going to be driving for a while.

With stock or near stock size tires I'd think cruising at rpm's at 2500 or above would kill MPG. Guess I'll be following everyone's experience.
 

Frenchy

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Hey all!
I was searching the threads for this but could not really find anything in relation to this particular question. As this is may be an odd question

So we all know about our Rangers and their LUGGING issues, especially in 9th/10th gear.

I have an Eibach Coilover suspension package, so about 3.5" level up front, stock rear height. Leveled out the truck nicely
And also running 33" tires (32.7"). Which does not help the lugging issue or transmission shift points

I don't have a tune, I'm looking to keep the warranty for a few more years so I'm thinking about going with FP just to get some extra power and maybe a little mpg back from the oversized tires and brush guard/winch combo haha

I have been trying to defeat this lugging issue and have been playing around with locking out gears
At highway speeds, 75-80mph I have been locking out gear 10, so in 9th gear I'm around 2000rpm, decreased lugging and slightly better gas mileage
City speeds about 45-50mph been running gear 7 at about the same rpm (~2000)

I decided to push it a little further - at highway speeds been using 8th gear, cruising about 2500-2600 around 76-80mph and I've seen a bump in gas mileage, cruising at that rpm range. I've gained 1.5-2mpg and lugging is basically nonexistent. City speeds ~50mph been cruising in 6th gear about 2400-2500 rpm as well with increased gas mileage of about the same.

Guess my question is if that will hinder anything down the road, long term? I don't know much about the A10 trans, I've been an old school, good ole boy-backyard mechanic for many years. Most of my previous (older cars) would run about that rpm range if not higher at those speeds. With the A10 its been a learning experience. As of my very little knowledge about the A10 trans, are they meant to cruise at those lower rpm? I did not know if any of you had knowledge if cruising at those rpm ranges long term would cause excessive heat or wear and tear etc? Not like I'm cruising at 4500-5000 or anything, i know 2000-2500 is not that high by any means, but from what I've experienced with this transmission, if I allowed it to do its thing from factory, it will always try and cruise at 1000rpm if it could 🤣 lug lug lug.

Thank you all for reading my noob, convoluted rant. Any information provided is always welcomed with open arms and no offense will be taken if jabs are thrown my way for this question.

Happy Lugging!
Alrighty so the negatives you have hurting you MPG, the leveling kit and the tires. Simple as that. Even a lift kit can cause the same thing. Also depending on the tire you are running that may cause a more negative effect as well. Things you can simply do to help is tune it. Wich tune you ask? Well stay with a reputable company of course. The 3 I would recommend, Ford Performance, Roush and Livernois.

Of those 3 I prefer Livernois. Why you ask? Well I run thier Tow tune and instead of going for max power it goes for efficiency. And of course you can go ahead and tow without having to swap tunes and not put the transmission into learn mode again.

With Ford Performance the one thing I dont like is it Downgrades the warranty(not to be confused with voiding the warranty) where the powertrain becomes a 3 year 36,000 mile coverage from the original purchase date.

For Roush I feel the only draw back is you can take the tune out like most other tunes.

Now I do have Firestone Destination XT'S in 285/70-17 with the Old Man EMU lift along with the Livernois Tow Tune and depending on my conditions I can easily see the mid high 20's. Other conditions I may see the teens because a turbo 4 does not like going down the HWY at 80 MPH with a headwind.

Thats my input and I hope it helps you.
 

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Tow mode adds about 400 rpm and helps remove the lugging sluggish performance. Reduces the gear changing by staying in a gear longer. I find myself using it more often since trying it.
 

OFC Ranger

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The 10 speed was a mistake in this truck. I suspect the only reason it even exists is to appease EPA goals.

Think back to older cars you drove, 2000-2500 rpm cruising speed was normal.

I too have started using only 7 gears for in town and 8 gears on the highway, but will sometimes manually bump it to 10 if I am on a long flat or downhill track of interstate.

I am actually considering going down to 6 gears in town.

The transmission is the one big thing on this truck, about the only thing, I have really grown to dislike.

A tune does help a lot, but after driving a tune for over a year, you come to realize the manually setting the gears is the only way to fix it.

There is a reason that most manual transmissions that exist still top out at 6 gears total...

Hell I've been mulling over just using sport mode exclusively and see how bad the MPG is with 93 tune.
 
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Rviator

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Backyard experts stuck in the old paradigm of the proper cruising rpm should realize that the design and efficiency of todays engines is far different than the engines of old that mated to 3 speed automatics. Is the normal trans mode tuned for fuel mileage and EPA requirements? Sure but that's why there's sport and tow mode for those conditions. The 10 speed so far has shown to be a very good transmission choice for all Ford rwd vehicles.
 

Dgc333

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FWIW, the MT82 6 spd manual that comes in Mustangs has a .65 over drive ratio in 6th gear. The 10R80 10 spd automatic has a .64 over drive ratio in 10th gear. Assuming they two transmissions are infront of a rear end with the same final drive ratio with the same diameter tires the rpm the engine turns in top gear is going to be the same.

Having had a 2.3 Ecoboost Mustang with a 6 spd manual since January 15. The 3.55 gear 27.1" diameter tire combo verse the Ranger 3.73 gear 31.6" tire diameter combo pretty much has the same engine rpm in top gear for a given speed.

The issue with the Ranger is the programming of the 10 spd not the number of gears. The programming tries to get the tranny into top gear as soon as possible which in many cases has the rpm down around 1200 rpm which is starting to lug the engine. What I have learned over the past 6 years and almost 100,000 miles is the sweet spot for relaxed cruising and max mileage is in the 1500 to 2000 rpm range.

I put the FP tune on my Ranger and it has solved 96% of the issue in drive. It keeps the rpm in the 1500 to 2000 most of the time and will down shift a gear when the rpm drops below 1400.
 

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Sport mode with a tune and it's a 🚀.

I'll notice the lugging more when I forget to put it in S and driving to work there's one area it lugs all the time. I did drive a Jeep last week with an 8 speed auto and the 2.0 turbo and didn't notice any lugging at all. Seems like the 8 speed is the way to go and will hopefully see come spring. It definitely helps locking out 9th & 10th on ours.
 
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FunInTheSun

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The 10 speed was a mistake in this truck. I suspect the only reason it even exists is to appease EPA goals.

Think back to older cars you drove, 2000-2500 rpm cruising speed was normal.

I too have started using only 7 gears for in town and 8 gears on the highway, but will sometimes manually bump it to 10 if I am on a long flat or downhill track of interstate.

I am actually considering going down to 6 gears in town.
I mostly agree with you, but I just want to point out that you aren't really complaining about the "transmission" as much as you are the "programming" of the transmission. The transmission just gives a wider range of gear selection choices. The logic of which gear the transmission should be in is determined by the controller, and that is programmed by Ford to meet a wide range of requirements, some of which are related to minimizing fuel consumption, even if the selection produces unwanted effects like lugging (high-load / low-rpm operation producing obvious undesirable vibrations). They are forced to do this to stay in business and make a profit due to CAFE regulations and the heavy fines levied on car makers who fail to meet the ever-increasing Federal mileage targets. This results in the drivability issues we notice in the default driving mode ("D" mode), because the default mode is used for Federal Testing.

So to satisfy customer demands for a "better" driving experience, we have been granted alternative modes of operation, like "S" mode, "Tow" mode, and manual override of gear selection (within limits). So don't tell Uncle Granny, but we can drive in these alternative modes whenever we want to, even if we aren't "towing" something...

I like to use Tow mode most of the time, because I find "locking out" gears to be annoying, because it has to be attended to whenever the speed limits change. Tow Mode raises the shift points just enough to avoid the worst of the booming / lugging vibration that the default program is programmed to produce. I like S mode too, but it raises the shift points too much for sedate cruising. I just use this mode for smooth passing or just to alleviate the occasional booming at certain cruising speeds.

Ford is making the best of a bad situation, and they have a great transmission hobbled by bad programming. The only drawback to having a 10 speed transmission is that it is going to spend a LOT more time shifting than a 3 speed. And when you spends so much more time shifting, it is noticeable more frequently when the job is performed "less than optimally".
 

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SNIP... I have an Eibach Coilover suspension package, so about 3.5" level up front, stock rear height. Leveled out the truck nicely
And also running 33" tires (32.7"). Which does not help the lugging issue or transmission shift points...SNIP
I didn't see it expressly called out in your message so I'm going to assume no, but did you update the computer with your new tire size? That would be the first thing I did if in your shoes. It does a few things for you:
1. Makes your Speedometer accurate again
2. Makes your MPG accurate again
3. Helps your transmission adjust shift points to where they should be
4. Keeps the odometer accurate and thus your oil changes accurate

It won't fix your lugging issue 100% but it will help it and will give you a solid foundation with less variables out of whack to improve on. After getting that done, a TON of the advice in this thread will be come much more effective and beneficial.
 
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